WINES TO SUIT ALL SEASONS

Champagne Marie-Courtin Resonance – Pinot Noir from the Cote des Bar. Biodynamically, fermented with own yeasts, no dosage. The colour is a touch bronze and a more than a touch opaque-chalky, the aromas redolent of sun-ripened apricots, peaches (skins and stone), flowers and crushed rocks. Chalky notes linger on the precise, beautifully articulated, ever-so-long finish. In fact it resonates.

Summary: Real Pagne

 

Muscadet Clos des Briords, Domaine de la Pepiere – It’s September, there’s a r in the month if you’ve had the day from hell then deck those natives with the wine from shell, namely, the friskiest of frisky Muscadet. - Clos des Briords from old vines has shell and sea-salt qualities in abundance.

Summary: Salt of the sea.

 

Saumur Blanc Clos Romans, Thierry Germain – Unlike the above superior thirst-slaker this is the wine for a special occasion. It is epic Chenin where the limestone seems to have wept tears of joy into the wine – it is the cru within the cru of Thierry Germain’s, the oldest vines, all raging purity and longer than the collected works of Proust.

Summary: Saumur’s lease hath all too short a date

 

Vinu Jancu, La Garagista, Deirdre Heekin, Vermont – Homage to a very special vineyard on Mount Etna named Vinujancu this wine from the hybrid La Crescent grape. Hazy golden-orange, musky, wild mint, tarragon, white strawberry, little golden plums and pears, skinsy and grippy, and oh-so-alive.

Summary: Alpine fine wine.

 

Mauvais Temps, Nico Carmarans, Aveyron

The good bad time had by all is a blend of Braucol (or Bro-Cool if you are of the Plageoles disposition), which some of you may know as the sanguine Fer Servadou, and Negret de Banhars – which most of you may not have heard of since most of it resides in this one wine. Does it drink well? Well, does Nico Carmarans look like a bear? Of course, it does. Gravy on a stick.

Summary: Soif central

 

En Passant devant le Chateau, Les Vignes du Paradis

From old vines located in front of the Chateau de Pommard this Pinot is throbbingly purple rather than Burgundy-hued and the wine possesses a thrilling stony austerity that would bring a smile to the equally stony face of Hubert de Montille (he who loved “chiselled” wines).

Summary: Pommard by any other name

 

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